Find the Career of Your Dreams in Speech-Language Pathology

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a career in Speech-Language Pathology is an excellent and growing profession due to an aging population and medical advances improving survival rates of premature infants, trauma and stroke victims.  

For many years, FHSU graduates have achieved high national exam (Praxis) pass rates on the first attempt. Employers and externship supervisors actively seek out SLP graduates, and the department enjoys a superior job placement rate.  Enter the workforce with all the tools needed to excel. Academic success at FHSU makes you competitive in any job market, large or small, anywhere imaginable.

Recent alumni have worked in:

  • Practices within physician clinics
  • Government health agencies
  • Hospitals
  • Pre-school agencies
  • Rehabilitation companies
  • Infant-Toddler Programs
 
  • Educational systems and cooperatives
  • Home health care agencies
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Private practices in SLP
  • Universities
 

Still not sure if a degree in speech-language pathology is right for you?  Visit FHSU’s Academic Advising and Career Exploration Center to learn more about possible careers, or contact us to speak with a faculty advisor with experience in the field.

Be sure to join the Department of Communication Disorders on Facebook, where we share news and events, discuss relevant tops in the profession and make connections with one another:  /uploadedImages/academic/college_of_health_and_life_sciences/communication_disorders/images/facebook-button.gif

FHSU Communication Disorders graduates - out in the world

Jennifer_smithJennifer Smith (2012)
Speech-Language Pathologist
Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital
Lincoln, NE
The variety of clinical opportunities provided at FHSU played a crucial part in my professional development. I use the knowledge and skills acquired in classes and clinical experience every day when I interact with patients who have suffered a brain injury. Working in a large rehabilitation hospital, I apply research skills and writing in many daily projects. The variety of AAC devices I worked with as a student at FHSU also transcend into my daily therapy for the inpatient population at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. The ‘high touch’ and ‘high tech’ vision of the department created lasting relationships and established a professional network for students. The program at FHSU allowed me to grow as a student, a professional, and a person.
Jenna-HoffhinesJenna Hoffhines (2006, 2008)
Speech-Language Pathologist
Blue Valley School District
Overland Park, KS
I work with K-5 grade students with language, social, and articulation needs, with several children on the autism spectrum, and with our “English as a Second Language” program. I also participate in transdisciplinary play based assessments for children ages 3-5. My team consists of an Occupational Therapist/Early Childhood teacher, School Psychologist, and myself. My academic and clinical education at FHSU taught me how to work with children of all ages with a variety of disorders. I enjoyed getting hands on clinical experiences very early on in the program at FHSU. My clinical supervisors and fellow classmates provided me with several ideas that I have continued to use with my current students. The Herndon Clinic is an amazing part of our department and allows us to have real clients to learn from.
Tricia-ClineTricia Cline (1999)
Admissions Director
FHSU
Hays, KS
At this point in my career, I owe everything to my education at FHSU. I am not a practicing speech-language pathologist; instead my career has taken me into higher education. My undergraduate academic work taught me how to effectively communicate with clients and other individuals, trained me to develop my critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and taught me a tremendous amount of self-confidence. The observation and hands-on experience here is extraordinary. I remember that right when I started the program, I had to start observing clinicians. All of the classes at FHSU have small class sizes, but the communication disorders faculty members make you feel like a family. The faculty and staff are such a close-knit group that it makes it easy to ask questions or to find people to help you.
Back to top