Department Catalog

Department of Informatics

Faculty: Stephen Schleicher, Chair; Rohlf, Hoffman, Jiang, Kettani, Martine, Shaffer, Tholstrup, Walburn, Walters 

For updated information, visit the FHSU Informatics Web site


Table of Contents:


Background

The Department of Informatics (INT) focuses on the use and movement of information. Technology enables this effort, but legal, social, economic, and ethical constraints are imperative components of study for people who will become “information leaders.” The Department of Informatics strives to create the “T” person. This is a creative person who has a breadth of understanding in the liberal arts, is an effective problem solver, and effective communicator. This breadth of understanding is reflected in the top of the “T.” A graduate will also have a depth of expertise in an area of media or information technology represented by the leg of the “T.”

The Department of Informatics is built upon a history that dates back to 1950 with a base in radio broadcasting. The Department has evolved as the means of electronically distributing information. It became a separate department in 1997 and has expanded substantially since that time. Today, the department provides both study on the creation of digital content such as audio, video (television & streaming video), web (text, graphics, audio, video, and transactional) , and a variety of new media . It also provides study in the movement and management of such information through complex and simple telecommunications, wide area and local area networks.

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Careers in Informatics

The department’s graduates work world-wide. These positions include traditional broadcast and new media professionals, computer networkers, network design engineers, systems engineers, web masters, web designers, web programmers, chief information officers, and information technology related sales, management , and regulatory positions. There are many career paths that the graduate in information networking may choose to pursue. Information services are found in both private and public organizations. A major strength of the program is that it develops highly valuable knowledge workers for the 21st-century.

Media studies graduates work in television, radio, corporate communications, marketing, and new media. They work for the major network affiliates (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, PBS), media production companies, and such diverse companies as HP and Honeywell. Some alumni own television and radio stations or production companies. Telecommunications and Networking graduates work in major corporations including such companies as Sprint, Cisco, AT&T, Qwest, Sykes, Nortel, MCI, and Wal-Mart Corporate. These graduates also work for a variety of smaller businesses and organizations such as Nex-Tech, Eagle Communications, Interactive Systems, hospitals, cities, school districts and law enforcement agencies. Web graduates are needed by a wide variety of organizations who maintain medium to complex web sites. They also work independently or in consulting groups creating e-commerce, business to business, transactional, and information web sites. Sample employers include Cisco, Nex-Tech, Eagle Communications, bowled-over.com, and Hays Medical Center.  Management Information Systems graduates are in high demand because of there preparation in business and information technology.  Graduates may work in businesses such as:  Cargill, Conoco-Phillips, DST, IBM and Koch Industries. Information Systems Engineering graduates will continue to be in high demand as network systems and data communications analysts and software engineers. Information Assurance graduates will also remain in high demand as the need increases to protect information exchanged through vital networks and databases. Information Systems Engineering and Information Assurance graduates may be employed by employers such as: the United States government, law enforcement agencies, hospitals, banks, research companies, consulting firms and more.

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Undergraduate Study

The department offers formal Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) with a concentration in Management Information Systems, Bachelor of Arts (BA) and the Bachelor of Science (BS) degrees with five undergraduate areas of concentration: Media Studies, Telecommunications and Networking, Information Systems Engineering, Management Information Systems and Web Development. Each concentration is designed to provide both a valuable theoretical knowledge base and valuable professional level skills. Students in this major typically complete 54 major hours comprising a 39-hour major and 15 hour specialized emphasis. Course work focuses on the dynamics of information, information and media technologies, and how they are designed and used. The information networking and telecommunications program’s goal is to produce information managers, leaders, and citizens who can effectively contribute to the success of the electronic media, and the many types of organizations that use networks and the web based content. Concentrations in Management Information Systems, Telecommunications and Networking and Web Development are offered not only on-campus, but also through distance learning as on-line courses.

The department offers a Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) concentration in Informatics. This degree is largely designed for distance learning students who have prior course work from other majors or institutions and who desire a flexible and mobile degree option. This undergraduate degree is described elsewhere in the catalog. A student seeking a BGS emphasis in INT will take a minimum of 21 hours of credit from this department. A student will have an advisor who will work with the student to develop and approve the flexible design of a bachelors of general studies.

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Minors in Information Networking & Telecommunications

A student earning a degree in another area at Fort Hays State University may earn a Minor in Informatics or Management Information Systems. A general minor consists of a minimum of 21 hours of Informatics and/or Management Information Systems courses, at least half of which must be upper division (300 level or above). A student will have a minor advisor who will work with the student to develop and approve the flexible design of a minor. The minor program of study will be filed with the Registrar's Office by the Advisor so that the minor will be noted on the student's transcript when it is completed.

Music Technology Minor

The Department of Informatics and the Department of Music jointly offer a minor in Music Technology. This minor is oriented for students interested in professional music recording and production. The minor is 21 credit hours and includes the following specific classes:

  • INT 140 Introduction to Electronic Media
  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace 
  • MUS 678 Seminar in Music Technology I
  • MUS 688 Seminar in Music Technology II
  • MUS 679 Topics in Music: Recording Practicum (2 sem)

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Emphasis in Informatics

A student may earn an Emphasis in Informatics consisting of 15 hours approved by his or her major advisor. A student majoring in Informatics will use this emphasis to develop a depth of expertise in an area. Students earning degrees in other areas may use an Emphasis in Informatics to develop a basic understanding of an area of Informatics. All pre- and co-requisites must be met or equivalents approved by instructors of the courses in which a student is enrolled. Students may earn multiple emphases, but courses may only count once toward a major or emphasis.

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Graduate Study

The department offers Master of Liberal Studies (MLS) concentrations in each Informatics Concentration area: Management Information Systems, Media Studies, Telecommunications and Networking, Information Assurance and Web Development; as well as a Master of Business Administration (MBA) with concentrations in Management Information Systems and Information Assurance. A Master of Liberal Studies’ student may also develop an interdisciplinary degree program that mixes courses from these areas and from other departments such as Mathematics and Computer Science, Communication, or Art. The Master of Liberal Studies program is generally a 31-hour degree that includes a 10-hour core with a 21-hour customized plan of study developed jointly by the student and advisor. The Master of Business Administration with concentrations in Management Information Systems and Information Assurance, as well as the Master of Liberal Studies concentrations of Web Development and Telecommunications and Networking are offered on-line.

The Department of Informatics in coordination with the Cisco Learning Institute has developed a special Master of Liberal Studies track that enables persons progressing through the CCNP instructor’s curriculum at designated CCNP-CAT locations to earn graduate credit. This credit will fit into the Master of Liberal Studies in Informatics.

Persons interested in graduate study in Media Studies alternatively may seek a Master of Science in Communication with an emphasis in Media Studies. This is an on-campus program due to the studio intensive nature of the media studies curriculum.

Additional information on graduate study and admissions.

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Professional Certifications

The Department of Informatics offers several information technology professional certification preparation programs. The FHSU Informatics department's website, contains the most current information. Certification preparation includes: Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP), Cisco Certified Academy Instructor (CCAI), and Oracle database certifications. Undergraduate or graduate credit is granted for these certification curriculum sets depending on the nature and level of curriculum.

Non-degree seeking persons with appropriate preparation may enroll in certification courses. Undergraduate students majoring in INT generally will apply hours taken in these courses toward a specialized emphasis in Informatics. Undergraduates from other departments are welcomed in these courses, applicability to degrees will be determined by the student’s major department. Graduate students may apply relevant courses to a Master of Liberal Studies in Informatics. Persons pursuing the Master of Instructional Technology may apply six certification hours toward that graduate degree as electives.

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Specialized Certificates

Fort Hays State University offers several specialized certificates that may be within a major, taken as electives, or taken in a non-degree status.

Internetworking Certificate

The FHSU Internetworking Certification is designed to provide key skills for persons desiring to be computer networking professionals. A student completing the FHSU certification will have finished the course work necessary to sit for the prestigious Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) examination. The five classes in this certification also apply toward the FHSU bachelors degree in Telecommunications and Networking offered by the Department of Informatics.

  • INT 291 Internetworking I (3)
  • INT 292 Internetworking II (3)
  • INT 293 Internetworking III (3)
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I (3)
  • INT 681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II (3)

Total Credit Hours: 15

Business Information Systems Certificate

In today's technologically advanced business environment, employees must have knowledge of the computing and allied technologies used in business operations, communications and education. The Business Information Systems certificate provides individuals who do not hold or who are not seeking an information systems degree with a greater understanding of information systems. This certificate is designed to help you incorporate information technology into your current position, to oversee the information technology function in your area, and to collaborate with the information systems function to identify and leverage opportunities for greater productivity and efficiency.

  • MIS 304 Management Information Systems
  • MIS 315 Enterprise Resource Planning
  • MIS 330 Business Intelligence
  • MIS 602 Information Systems Design & Analysis
  • MIS 640 Advanced Management Information Systems

Total Credit Hours: 15

Web and E-Business Certificates

Fort Hays State University is pleased to offer a series of courses and certificate options to prepare students in web-based applications. All courses listed are offered on-line with no requirements for physical presence on-campus. These certificates can be earned as a “stand alone credential” by persons who are in the working world who need “real time” knowledge and skills. They can be earned by undergraduate or graduate students as supplements to a degree. These certificates can fit into the Bachelors of General Studies, Masters of Liberal Studies in Informatics, or may supplement a Masters of Business Administration or Masters of Sciences in Communication Studies or other graduate programs.

Certificate in Web Development

This certificate is designed for the person who seeks the skills to create high-end websites with strong design and functional abilities. Such sites are used for e-commerce, data services, internal organization workflow, multi-media distribution and other uses where information is provided or gathered. This certificate includes design as well as coding courses.

  • INT 250 Intro to Web (F,S, Su) (Leveling course for Graduate Students)
  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design (F,S, Su) 3
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development (F) 3
  • INT 652 Intensive Web Development (S) 3
  • INT 654 Introduction to Web-Enabled Databases: Oracle (F) 3
  • INT 655 Web Enabled Database Administration: Oracle (S) 3
    (Optional for Undergraduate, Required for Graduate)

Total Credit Hours: 15 undergraduate - 18 graduate

Certificate in E-Commerce Web Development

This certificate is designed for the person who seeks the skills to create an e-commerce site and who desires to understand the fundamentals of e-commerce marketing and strategy.

  • INT 250 Intro to Web (F, S, Su) (Leveling course for Graduate Students) 3
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development (F) 3
  • INT 652 Intensive Web Development (S) 3

And choose from two (undergraduate), or three (graduate) of:

  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design (F,S, Su) 3
  • INT 654 Introduction to Web-Enabled Databases: Oracle (F) 3
  • INT 655 Web Enabled Database Administration: Oracle (S) 3
  • MIS 603 Database Systems (undergraduate)
    or MIS 673 Problems in MIS/Database Systems (graduate) (S) 3
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace (S) 3

Total Credit Hours: 15 undergraduate - 18 graduate

(F = Fall, S = Spring, Su = Summer, offerings on-line)

Information Networking for Criminal Justice Certificate

The Departments of Political Science, Justice Studies and Informatics offer a joint certificate whose purpose is to prepare students to work in law enforcement performing information technology related investigation or support. This certification when coupled with a major in Justice Studies or Informatics, provides a graduate with additional opportunities and expertise. This certificate is also open to non-degree seeking students.

  • JUS 305 Corporate Crime and Deviance (3)
  • JUS 225 Information Age Technology and Justice System (3)
  • INT 250 Introduction to Web Development (3)
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace (3)
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I (3)

Total Credit Hours: 15

# English 101 & 102 are highly recommended as prerequisites for this course
*Math 110 College Algebra is a prerequisite for this course.

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International Informatics Programs

The demand for persons with skills and abilities in Informatics is world-wide. International students are welcomed and are believed to have valuable perspectives to share with American students. The Department of Informatics and the Department of Modern Languages encourage a series of opportunities that open international doors for students. These include pursuit of the Bachelors of Arts with its 10 credit hour Modern Language Component, the additional pursuit of an Emphasis in Modern Languages with a 16 credit hour Modern Language component, or the pursuit of a dual degree in Informatics and Modern Languages (154 credit hours total – typically two degrees in five years). The two departments are developing international internships for students proficient in languages in countries such as France, Germany, Norway, Mexico, and Japan. Students are encouraged to take advantage of Fort Hays State University’s membership in the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) that allows students to spend a semester or academic year abroad at their home institution’s tuition rate (Typically this works into a student’s schedule best during the sophomore year when a student is largely taking general education courses). Finally, the Department of Modern Languages offers a variety of spring break and summer study tours to Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

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Internships

An internship is an experience that exposes a student to a professional work environment in his or her area of interest. An internship may be taken for 1-6 hours of university credit. Typically, a student will spend 50 hours of time in an internship for each credit hour earned and will participate in reflective assignments under the guidance of his or her instructor. Internships may be paid or may be without compensation.

Undergraduate students are strongly encouraged by the Department of Informatics to perform at least one internship. Internships help to bring relevancy to the student’s classroom study and often provide a variety of experiences that enrich classroom discussion. They often help to open doors to career opportunities and permanent placement for students.

Graduate internships in Informatics may be enrolled in by students in the Master of Liberal Studies and Master of Science in Communication. Among other options, graduate students may use an internship to serve as the culminating project for the Master of Liberal Studies. The faculty of the Department of Informatics warn that such an internship should not be used as a culminating project by persons considering graduate work beyond the master’s level. A culminating internship must be approved by the student’s graduate advisor and must have significant activities that require a student to demonstrate competencies developed in the MLS graduate work. A graduate student choosing an internship as the culminating project must complete a traditional comprehensive examination to satisfy the requirements of the Fort Hays State University Graduate School.

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Affiliations

The department maintains affiliation with the National Broadcasting Society, the National Association of Broadcasters, the Kansas Association of Broadcasters, the National Association of Collegiate Broadcasters, the Kansas Association of Broadcast Educators, the Department of Defense, the Cisco Learning Institute, Oracle Academic Initiative and the Kansas Cisco Networking Academy System, the International Technology Education and Research  Association, the Docking Institute of Public Affairs, the Kansas Bar Association, and other organizations.

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Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Central to the bachelor degree program is a set of basic competencies used in the development of the degree core requirements and each area of emphasis. The 39-hour base degree includes a core 18-hour requirement that all Informatics majors must complete. The core builds a common understanding of information, fundamental technologies, relevant law and ethics, leadership and management, problem solving, statistical and qualitative analysis, and teamwork. This major is not dependent on technology but rather remains sensitive to changes in technology and strives to create professionals who will continue to learn and to adapt as new technologies and opportunities present themselves.

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Informatics includes the university’s 55-hour general education program, 39 hours of degree requirements, a recommended 15-hour emphasis in INT, 10 hours of modern language (which includes 3 sequential courses and a 1-hour lab), and 5 hours of free elective course work. A total of 124 credit hours must be successfully completed for graduation.

Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Science in Informatics includes the university’s 55-hour general education program, 39 hours of degree requirements, a recommended 15-hour emphasis in INT, and 15 hours of free elective course work. A total of 124 credit hours must be successfully completed for graduation.

Bachelor of Business Administration

The Bachelor of Business Administration includes the university's 55-hour general education program, 27 hours of Business Core course work, 27 hours of Management Information Systems Core course work, and an additional 15 hours of Management Information Systems electives.

 

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Media Studies

The Media Studies Concentration is designed to prepare students to become television or radio announcers focusing on news or sports. Students may focus on producing video or audio for media or organizational purposes. Students may also prepare for careers in media sales or management. A student will work with his or her advisor to design an academic path that fits his or her career choices. Media Studies students take a common media core within the major and may use the emphasis to emphasize one of the five following areas. With the approval of the advisor, other options may be developed.

  • News Media
  • Electronic News
  • Electronic Sports
  • Production
  • Performance

University Degree Requirements Hours

Specified General Education Courses
Foundation Studies Credit Hours: 18

Elective/Specified General Education Courses:

Liberal Arts

International Studies Component (elect two of three courses) 6

Distribution Areas:

Humanities: 9

  • COMM 318 Communication in Human Organizations 3
    (Two electives, this recommended)
  • PHIL 100 General Logic 3

Mathematics and Natural Sciences (three electives plus one lab, these recommended) 10

  • MATH 234 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 5
    or MATH 331 Calculus Methods 3
  • MATH 250 Elements of Statistics 3
  • PHYS 102 Physical Science 3
  • PHYS 103 Physical Science Lab 1

Social and Behavioral Sciences (three electives, these recommended) 9

  • ECFI 201 Principles of Economics Micro 3
  • POLS 300 Current Political Issues 3

Upper-division Integrative Course (one elective, these two recommended) 3

  • IDS 401 Ethical Issues in the Professions and Business 3
    or IDS 390 Technology in Society 3

For Bachelor of Arts: Modern Language Courses (Beginning courses I, II, III, and lab) 10

University Degree Requirements……………………………………………………….BA 65 BS 55

Department/Major Requirements

Informatics Major Core

  • INT 250 Introduction to Web Development 3
  • INT 300 Foundations for Information Networking 3
  • INT 405 Research Methods in Information Networking 3
  • INT 430 Leadership in Information Networking 3
  • INT 490 Capstone Seminar in Information Networking 3
  • INT 610 Policy, Law, and Ethics in INT 3

Total Credit Hours:18

Concentration Requirements Media Studies Track

  • INT 140 Introduction to Electronic Media 3
  • INT 342 Campus Radio Station Operations
    or INT 349 Campus Television Station Operations 3
  • INT 346 Video Production 3
  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production 3
  • INT 633 Advanced Video Production 3

Total Credit Hours: 15

Cross Concentration Elective Web Development
[one of the following courses]

  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace

Total Credit Hours: 3

Cross-Concentration Emphasis Elective--Telecommunications/Networking

  • INT 291 Internetworking I
  • INT 420 Social Issues in Informatics
  • INT 660 Global Telecommunications Policy
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I

Total Credit Hours: 3

Total Major Credit Hour Requirements: 39

New Media Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students who want to create web sites and their content for various electronic and new media

  • INT 624 Media Continuity Writing
    or INT 625 Electronic Journalism
  • INT 629 Media Management & Sales
    or INT 678 Seminar in INT/Project Management
  • INT 634 Graphics and Effects for Video and Film
  • INT 636 Computer Editing of Video
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development

Total Credit Hours: 15

Electronic News Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students interested in all areas of traditional television and/or radio broadcast news or writing and developing content for various news-oriented sites on the World Wide Web.

  • INT 625 Electronic Journalism
  • INT 629 Media Management & Sales
  • INT 636 Computer Editing of Video
  • INT 638 Intensive Video Production
  • COMM 626 Legal Issues & Reporting

Total Credit Hours: 15

Electronic Sports Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students interested in play-by-play sports announcing for radio, television, or sports sites on the World Wide Web.

  • INT 340 Media Performance
  • INT 479 Internship in INT/Advanced Sports Announcing
  • INT 625 Electronic Journalism
  • INT 629 Media Management and Sales
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Intermediate Sports Announcing

Total Credit Hours: 15

Production Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students who want to learn how to make high quality radio and television commercials or corporate promotional videos.

  • INT 624 Media Continuity Writing
    or INT 625 Electronic Journalism
    or INT 678 Seminar in INT/Project Management
  • INT 629 Media Management & Sales
  • INT 633 Advanced Video Production
  • INT 636 Computer Editing of Video
    or INT 634 Graphics and Effects for Video and Film
  • INT 638 Intensive Video Production

Total Credit Hours: 15

Performance Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students interested in being talent for various media whether behind the microphone or in front of the TV camera.

  • INT 340 Broadcast Performance
  • INT 479 Internship in INT (2 credit hrs)
  • INT 624 Media Continuity Writing
  • INT 625 Electronic Journalism
  • INT 629 Media Management & Sales
  • SLP 472 Problems in SLP: Professional Voice Clinic (1 credit hr)

Total Credit Hours:15

Music Technology Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students who are interested in working the music industry recording, producing and distributing music.

  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace 
  • MUS 498 Recording Practicum (2 semesters - 2 credit hours each)
  • MUS 678 Seminar in Music Technology I
  • MUS 678 Seminar in Music Technology 2

Total Credit Hours: 16

Total Major & Emphasis Credit Hour Requirements: 54 or 55 depending on emphasis

Recommended Choices for Free Electives

  • POLS 320 Introduction to the Law
  • LDRS 300/302/310 Leadership Certificate Program

Free Electives Credit Hours: BA - 5, BS - 15

University Degree Requirements: BA - 55 BS - 65

Department/Major Requirements: 54

Free Electives: BA - 5, BS - 15

Total Credit Hours: 124

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Computer Networking & Telecommunications Concentration

The Computer Networking & Telecommunications Concentration is designed to prepare students to be Network Design Engineers, Network Engineers, System Administrators, and for other positions requiring substantial knowledge of network design and operation. This track prepares students both to work in the “carrier” environment of telephone companies and the “enterprise” environment more commonly associated with organizations such as individual companies, health care organizations, governments, etc. Students will likely decide to prepare for the Cisco Network Associate (CCNA) and Cisco Network Professional (CCNP) certifications within their emphasis.

University Degree Requirements Hours

Specified General Education Courses:

Foundation Studies: 18

Elective/Specified General Education Courses:

Liberal Arts

International Studies Component (elect two of three courses) 6

Distribution Areas:

Humanities: 9

  • COMM 318 Communication in Human Organizations 3
    (Two electives, this recommended)
  • PHIL 100 General Logic 3

Mathematics and Natural Sciences (three electives plus one lab, these recommended) 10

  • MATH 234 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 5
    or MATH 331 Calculus Methods 3
  • MATH 250 Elements of Statistics 3
  • PHYS 102 Physical Science 3
  • PHYS 103 Physical Science Lab 1

Social and Behavioral Sciences (three electives, these recommended) 9

  • ECFI 201 Principles of Economics Micro 3
  • POLS 300 Current Political Issues 3

Upper-division Integrative Course (one elective, these two recommended) 3

  • IDS 401 Ethical Issues in the Professions and Business 3
    or IDS 390 Technology in Society 3

For Bachelor of Arts: Modern Language Courses (Beginning courses I, II, III, and lab) 10

Department/Major Requirements

Informatics Major Core

  • INT 250 Introduction to Web Development 3
  • INT 300 Foundations for Information Networking 3
  • INT 430 Leadership in Information Networking 3
  • INT 405 Research Methods in Information Networking 3
  • INT 490 Capstone Seminar in Information Networking 3
  • INT 610 Policy, Law, and Ethics in INT 3

Total 18

Concentration Requirements ( Computer Networking & Telecommunications Track):

  • PHYS 230 Telecommunications Electronics 3
  • INT 291 Internetworking I 3
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I 3
  • INT 681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II 3

Plus one of the following:

  • INT 293 Internetworking II
  • INT 662 Modern Telephony
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT: Unix System Administration
  • CSCI 261 Computer Science I
  • MIS 303 Computer Operating Systems
  • MIS 304 Management Information Systems I

Total 3

Cross Concentration Elective Media Studies
[one of the following courses]

  • INT 140 Introduction to Electronic Media
  • INT 346 Video Production
  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production
  • INT 349 Campus Television Station Operation
  • INT 625 Broadcast Journalism

Total 3

Cross Concentration Elective Web Development
[one of the following courses]

  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace 

Total 3

Degree Total 39


 

 

Telecommunications & Networking Emphasis

[Five of the following courses as approved by the student's faculty advisor:]

  • INT 291 Internetworking I (CCNA Prep)
  • INT 293 Internetworking II (CCNA Prep)
  • INT 420 Social Issues in Information Networking
  • INT 472 Readings in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 473 Problems in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 476 Apprenticeship in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 479 Internship in INT (strongly suggested for all students)(3 hours accepted for emphasis)
  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development
  • INT 652 Intensive Web Development
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace 
  • INT 662 Modern Telephony
  • INT 664 Wireless and Cellular Systems
  • INT 670 Workshop in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Web Enabled Databases
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Unix Administration
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Linux for Networks
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Advanced Linux for Networks
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II
  • INT 695 Advanced Routing (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 696 Advanced Remote Access (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 697 Advanced LAN Switching (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 698 Internetwork Trouble Shooting
  • MIS 303 Computer Operating Systems
  • MIS 304 Management Information Systems I
  • MIS 602 Information Systems Design and Development
  • MIS 645 Artificial Intelligence Systems & Applications
  • MIS 673 Problems in MIS/Electronic Commerce
  • MIS 673 Problems in MIS/MCSE Prep I
  • MIS 673 Problems in MIS/MCSE Prep II
  • CSCI 261 Computer Science I
  • CSCI 369 Java Programming
  • CSCI 345 Foundations of Computing
  • CSCI 466 Software Engineering I
  • TECS 425 Electronic Communications
  • PHYS 230 Telecommunications Electronics

Total 15

Total Major & Emphasis Requirements 54

Recommended Choices for Free Electives

  • TECS 120 Power, Energy & Transportation
  • POLS 320 Introduction to the Law
  • MGT 608 Total Quality Management
  • HIST 305 Commerce, Industry & Society
  • LDRS 300, 302, 310 Leadership Certificate Program

Free Electives BA 5 BS 15

Total

University Degree Requirements BA 55 BS 65

Department/Major Requirements 54

Free Electives BA 5 BS 15

Total 124

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Web Development Concentration

The Web Development Concentration is designed to prepare students for the myriad opportunities in the web enabled world of communication and commerce. In small organizations, professionals need a full breadth of skills. In larger organizations, this profession appears to be dividing into “designers” and “coders.” The major concentration provides students with a strong base in web development. The Web Development Emphasis allows a student to build on the concentration and specifically prepare for one of these alternatives. A student will confer with his or her advisor and will select emphasis courses based upon a student’s career goals.

University Degree Requirements Hours

Specified General Education Courses:

Foundation Studies 18

Elective/Specified General Education Courses:

Liberal Arts

International Studies Component (elect two of three courses)…………………………………………...6

Distribution Areas:

Humanities: (9)

    (Required: COMM 318 Communication in Human Organizations) 3

Mathematics and Natural Sciences (three electives and one lab) 10

Social and Behavioral Sciences (three electives, these recommended) 9

    ECFI 201 Principles of Economics Micro 3
    POLS 300 Current Political Issues 3

Upper-division Integrative Course (one elective, these recommended)

    IDS 401 Ethical Issues in the Professions and Business 3
    or IDS 390 Technology in Society 3

For Bachelor of Arts: Modern Language Courses (Beginning courses I, II, III, and lab) 10

University Degree Requirements BA 65 BS 65

Informatics Major Core

  • INT 250 Introduction to Web Development 3
  • INT 300 Foundations for Information Networking 3
  • INT 405 Research Methods in Information Networking 3
  • INT 430 Leadership in Information Networking 3
  • INT 490 Capstone Seminar in Information Networking 3
  • INT 610 Policy, Law and Ethics in INT 3

Total Credit Hours: 18

Concentration Requirements Web Development Track

  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design 3
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development 3
  • INT 652 Intensive Web Development 3
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace 3
  • ART 240 Basic Design 3

Total Credit Hours: 15

Cross Emphasis Elective Media Studies
[one of the following courses]

  • INT 140 Introduction to Electronic Media
  • INT 322 Topics In INT/News Room Operations
  • INT 625 Broadcast Electronic Journalism
  • INT 346 Video Production
  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production

Total Credit Hours: 3

Cross Emphasis Elective Telecommunications/Networking
[one of the following courses]

  • INT 291 Internetworking I
  • INT 420 Social Issues in Informatics
  • INT 660 Global Telecommunications Policy
  • INT 662 Modern Telephony
  • INT 664 Wireless and Cellular Systems
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Date Communication I

Total Credit Hours: 3

Degree Credit Hour Total: 39


 

Web Development Emphasis
[Five of the following courses as approved by the student's faculty advisor:]

  • INT 291 Internetworking I (CCNA Prep)
  • INT 293 Internetworking II (CCNA Prep)
  • INT 322 Topics In INT/News Room Operations
  • INT 342 Campus Radio Station Operation
  • INT 426 Internship in INT (strongly suggested for all students)(3 hours accepted for emphasis)
  • INT 346 Video Production
  • INT 348 Beginning Audio Production
  • INT 349 Campus Television Operation
  • INT 420 Social Issues in Information Networking
  • INT 472 Readings in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 473 Problems in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 476 Apprenticeship in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 625 Electronic Journalism
  • INT 633 Advanced Video Production
  • INT 634 Graphics and Effects for Video and Film
  • INT 636 Computer Editing of Video
  • INT 638 Intensive Video Production
  • INT 654 Introduction to Web-Enabled Databases: Oracle
  • INT 655 Web Enabled Database Administration: Oracle
  • INT 662 Modern Telephony
  • INT 664 Wireless and Cellular Systems
  • INT 670 Workshop in INT (as approved by advisor)
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Unix Administration
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Linux for Networks
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Advanced Linux for Networks
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Web Enabled Databases
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I
  • INT 681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II
  • INT 695 Advanced Routing (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 696 Advanced Remote Access (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 697 Advanced LAN Switching (CCNP Prep)
  • INT 698 Internetwork Troubleshooting
  • MIS 303 Computer Operating Systems
  • MIS 304 Management Information Systems I
  • MIS 602 Information Systems Design and Development
  • MIS 645 Artificial Intelligence Systems & Applications
  • MIS 673 Problems in MIS/Electronic Commerce
  • CSCI 345 Foundations of Computing
  • CSCI 261 Computer Science I
  • CSCI 369 Java Programming
  • CSCI 466 Software Engineering I
  • ART 243 Graphic Design
  • ART 244 Creative Photography
  • ART 245 Computer-Assisted Graphics Design
  • TECS 425 Electronic Communications
  • TECS 812 Multimedia Applications

Total Credit Hours: 15

Total Major & Emphasis Credit Hour Requirements 54

Recommended Choices for Free Electives

  • POLS 320 Introduction to the Law
  • LDRS 300/302/310 Leadership Certificate Program

Free Electives BA 5 BS 15

University Degree Requirements BA 55 BS 65

Department/Major Requirements 54

Free Electives BA 5 BS 15

Total 124

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Bachelor of General Studies in Informatics

The Department of Informatics is pleased to offer a concentration in the Bachelor of General Studies (BGS). The advantages of this degree are a student’s ability and flexibility to take the full course of study on-line. Traditional, on-campus students are generally advised to enroll in one of the more structured concentrations within the Informatics major.

A student must meet all FHSU BGS requirements and take a minimum of 21 hours of approved Informatics courses. Informatics courses are multi-disciplinary, reflecting the varying skills and needs of today's high technology work environment.

Applicable Fort Hays State University INT courses currently offered on-line through the Virtual College at the time the catalog was published are listed below. An up-to-date listing can be found at the Distance Learning Web site.

  • INT 250 Introduction to Web Development +
  • INT 291 Internetworking I
  • INT 293 Internetworking II
  • INT 300 Foundations for Information Networking
  • INT 322 Topics in INT/Internetworking I for Military
  • INT 322 Topics in INT/Internetworking II for Military
  • INT 322 Topics in INT/Internetworking III for Military
  • INT 322 Topics in INT/Internetworking IV for Military
  • INT 430 Leadership in Information Networking
  • INT 490 Capstone Seminar in Information Networking ^
  • INT 610 Policy, Law and Ethics in INT
  • INT 650 Interactive Systems Design
  • INT 651 Advanced Web Development
  • INT 652 Intensive Web Development
  • INT 654 Introduction to Web-Enabled Databases: Oracle
  • INT 655 Web Enabled Database Administration: Oracle
  • INT 658 Law of Cyberspace $
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Unix Administration
  • INT 678 Seminar in INT/Linux for Telecommunications Systems
  • INT 680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I
  • INT 681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II
  • PHYS 230 Telecommunications Electronics #

+Introduction to Web Development is a pre-requisite for Intensive and Advanced Web Development and Seminar in INT/Unix Administration. It is a co-requisite (can be taken at the same time) for Interactive Systems Design, and Network Architecture and Data Communication I.

#College Algebra is a pre-requisite for these courses.

Internetworking I, II, III & IV for the Military are courses providing preparation for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. These courses are more time-flexible and lab-oriented than the “fast-track” certification. They are priced differently than other FHSU on-line courses due to the equipment and services provided with these courses. The price for these three courses includes tuition, all fees, books, lab kits, access to the FHSU V-Lab for router configuration practice, and on-line and telephone support subject matter support. Information on CCNA.

*Internetworking I & II courses are the “fast-track” courses providing preparation for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. They are priced differently than other FHSU on-line courses due to the equipment and services provided with these courses. The price for these two courses includes tuition, all fees, books, lab kits, access to the FHSU V-Lab for router configuration practice, and on-line and telephone support subject matter support. Information on CCNA.

**Students completing Internetworking I & II and Network Architecture and Data Communications I & II will earn a Certificate in Internetworking from Fort Hays State University. This certification will be reflected on a student's FHSU transcript.

^ This course should be taken the final spring that a student is in the program.

$ The pre-requisites for this course include Policy/Law/Ethics in Information Networking, Intro to the Law, Business Law I or Permission of the Instructor.

The number of course offerings will grow to fit student and employer demands. Each of the courses listed is offered fully on-line and does not require a physical presence on-campus. Most of the course activities are completed at the convenience of a student’s study/work schedule. Each of the courses will have specific deadlines for projects, labs, tests and other activities. INT on-line classes other than Internetworking classes are enrolled through the Fort Hays State University Virtual College.

For more information visit the following web site: http://www.fhsu.edu/informatics/ . For questions about course offerings, contact the Fort Hays State University Department of Informatics at 785.628.5373. Email the department. To enroll or seek enrollment information, contact the Fort Hays State University Virtual College 785.628.4291. For more information regarding the BGS degree, please visit http://www.fhsu.edu/bgs/ or contact:

Joleen Briggs, Coordinator for Interdisciplinary Studies -- jmbriggs@fhsu.edu
College of Arts and Sciences
Fort Hays State University
Hays, Kansas
(785) 628-4234

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Master of Liberal Studies Informatics

Fort Hays State University (FHSU) is pleased to offer a concentration in the Master of Liberal Studies (MLS) with a concentration in Informatics. The Masters of Liberal Studies is a 31-hour interdisciplinary graduate program that is offered on-campus and on-line. It typically consists of a 10-hour core, an 18-hour customized plan of study and a 3-hour culminating project. One of the available areas of study is Informatics (INT). Students may also mix INT and Computer Information Systems or Technology Studies courses in customizing their plan. Information on the MLS in Informatics can be found at http://www.fhsu.edu/informatics. Additional documents relating to the graduate program can also be found at this site.

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Course Listings

Undergraduate Credit

140 Introduction to Electronic Media (3) This course presents an overview of the operations and history of the radio and television industry and its evolution to new media. It surveys contemporary media communication, strategy, industry issues, and policy issues. It also provides an introduction to the impact of the convergence of technologies in the electronic media.

250 Introduction to Web Development (3) This course provides the concepts and skills for planning, development, and deployment of web-based hypermedia systems. It covers the use of text, graphics, audio, and video in web environments and the conversion of existing systems to web environments. A major web-based project is required. This is a required course for INT majors. Requisites: PR, MIS 101, CSCI 163 or equivalent.

291 Internetworking I (3) Students will study the application of theories relevant to data communications for global internetworking and apply those concepts in assignments, including hands-on internetworking projects. Students will study topics that include the fundamentals of internetworking, the installation of physical transmission media, electrical safety, global and local network addressing schemes and their use, fundamental routing theory, fundamental LAN design, LAN installation and LAN troubleshooting. This is the first of two courses that prepare students for the Net+ (vendor neutral) or CCNA (CISCO specific) industry certification examinations. This course is part of the 12-hour certificate in internetworking offered by the Department of INT and it is a prerequisite to Internetworking II. Requisites: PR, MATH 110 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) or PERM.

293 Internetworking II (3) Students will build their skills and knowledge of internetworking using switching and routing technologies. An introduction to WAN protocols is included with hands-on exercises. Also included is a case study that walks students through LAN and WAN network design for a complex internetwork. Student skills learned in the prerequisite, Internetworking I, and in this course, will be drawn upon to complete a network design project. Students will complete hands-on exercises to set up networks. At the completion of this course, students with a strong command of the concepts presented should be ready to sit for the Net+ (vendor neutral) or CCNA (CISCO specific) industry certification examination. Requisite: PR, INT 291 or PERM.

300 The Field of Information Networking: A Foundation for Understanding (3) This course introduces the student to the basic principles of the field of Informatics and examines the technologies that are important in moving information. Completion of this course will allow the student to move on to more advanced courses within the major.

322 Topics in Informatics + (1-3) Course is designed to provide academic credit for a number of different areas in the Informatics Department. The student will study one particular topic in depth.

336 Electronic Newsroom Operation (3) This course focuses on the content creation of electronic news, public affairs programming, and sports. It serves as a laboratory class for applications of theories and skills developed in other INT courses. Requisites: INT 140 or PERM.

340 Media Performance (3) Presents fundamentals of announcing, including microphone techniques, voice use, pronunciation, and interpretation of copy.

342 Campus Radio Station Operation + (3) Students serve as staff and operate the campus radio station to apply previously learned broadcasting techniques. (May be taken two semesters.) Requisites: co-requisite, INT 140, or PERM.

346 Video Production (3) The student is introduced to the techniques of video production including practical application of instruction. Requisites: PR, INT 140 or PERM.

348 Beginning Audio Production (3) The study of audio production and the integration of technology-based techniques for the purpose of designing, implementing, and producing effective and attractive audio presentations. Course material is targeted toward information networking and communication majors or those disciplines which utilize electronic media as communication tools.

349 Campus Television Station Operation + (3) Presentation of television production and operations experience involving students in studio and remote productions through the operation of the access channels of Hays Cable Television and the Internet. (May be taken two semesters.) Requisites: PR, INT 346 or, co-requisite INT 633 or PERM.

405 Research Methods in Information Networking (3) This course studies information gathering and how quantitative and qualitative research methods are used in the electronic media, computer networking, and telecommunications industries. Requisites: INT 300 or PERM.

420 Social Issues and Information Networking (3) A sociological and cultural approach to the forces which have shaped and continue to shape information networking and telecommunications.

430 Leadership in Information Networking (3) This course is devoted to studying the role of leadership in information networking. The prime focus is on how to facilitate meaningful communication, develop organizational missions, and establish realistic goals and objectives using contemporary leadership theories and practices appropriate to information networking. Requisites: INT 300 or PERM.

472 Readings in Informatics (1-3) Special study by the student in a field of particular concentration.

473 Problems in Informatics + (1-4) Special problems encountered by the student in a field of concentration.

476 Apprenticeship in Informatics + (1-6) Course is designed to provide practical experience in teaching and administration of Information Networking and telecommunications.

479 Internship in Informatics (1-6) The internship is designed to supplement classroom instruction by providing the student with the opportunity to participate in a professional environment. It is considered a final stage of undergraduate course work in Informatics. The practical experience obtained, combined with the theoretical and application training in traditional course work, promotes the development of a well-rounded and professionally prepared individual. Requisites: PERM.

490 Capstone Seminar in Information Networking (3) This is an advanced course that studies information network theory through case study, application, and on-site observation. Emphasis is placed on studying actual information networking problems encountered in organizations and communities. Field work and compilation of the student’s portfolio is required as part of the course. Requisites: completion of all other INT degree core courses or its equivalent with PERM.

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Undergraduate/Graduate Credit

610 Policy, Law and Ethics in INT (3) This course addresses the regulation of computers networks, the telecommunications industries, and media distributors. Included is a consideration of the following: how regulation affects these industries and how developments in these industries affect public policy and society; how public policy is designated; and the moral and ethical obligations of these industries.

624 Media Continuity Writing (3) Develop creativity in writing continuity for radio and television with emphasis on commercial and promotional writing. Requisites: PR, INT 140 or PERM.

625 Electronic Journalism (3) This course provides theoretical and applied study of electronic journalism. It includes experience in gathering and writing news for broadcast on campus radio station, campus television, and streaming Internet distribution. Requisites: PR, INT 140 or PERM.

628 Media Law and Contemporary Society (3) The study of the legal aspects of media and how it affects the industry as it relates to what is seen and heard, its widespread influence on the formation of contemporary media, and its role in a dynamic social structure. Requisites: PR, INT 140.

629 Media Management and Sales (3) Presents the problems, theories, legal responsibilities, and economics of broadcast management and sales. Requisites: PR, INT 140 or PERM.

633 Advanced Video Production (3) Emphasis is placed on the development and production of video presentations to perfect various video production techniques. Requisites: PR, INT 346.

634 Graphics and Effects for Video and Film (3) This is a course focusing on advanced visual techniques in video post production. Students will develop mastery of graphic design for video and film and advanced operation of digital post production equipment. Students will understand the theory behind and have the opportunity to develop skills in post production techniques for the television, post production, and film industries. Requisites: PR, INT 346, INT 638, or PERM.

636 Computer Editing of Video (3) This course introduces digital non-linear editing and includes both the history and theory of the subject and the practicalities of running a modern computer-based editing system. An intense course offering students a working knowledge of the subject, a digitally edited project for their resume (reel or portfolio), and abilities that are an invaluable part of their skill set. Requisites: PR, INT 346, INT 638, or PERM.

638 Intensive Video Production (3) Advanced study and application of electronic production techniques in the field. Emphasis placed on shooting, lighting, directing, and editing of television news and on-location productions. Requisites: PR, INT 346, co-requisite INT 625 or PERM.

640 Advanced Broadcast Performance (3) Aspects of ad lib announcing, interviewing, and television presentations are presented. Requisites: PR, INT 141.

650 Interactive Systems Design (3) Interactive Systems Design presents ideas, theories and concepts in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). More specifically, the constructs of HCI are analyzed in order to develop simpler and more efficiently designed multi/hypermedia artifacts. This course is not, however, centered around the computer as a focus of development. The faculty and students will look at the computer as a tool but with special emphasis on the human senses and how these are affected by the computer. By understanding the human role in HCI, more proficient learning and presentation strategies can be instilled in the student. The basic focus is centered on the human-being in a technology-influenced environment.

651 Advanced Web Development (3) Advanced techniques and concepts for the planning, development, and implementation of information systems on the World Wide Web or organizational intranets. Extensive study of principles of interaction design, security, and performance. Requisites: PR, MIS 101 or CSCI 163 or equivalent and INT 250.

652 Intensive Web Development (3) This is a course that involves the intensive study of concepts and skills for planning, development, and deployment of web-based hypermedia systems. It includes coverage of text, graphics, audio, and video in web environments; as well as conversion of existing systems to web environments. A major web-based project and paper are required. Requisites: PR, MIS 101, CSCI 163 or equivalent, INT 250 or equivalent.

654 Introduction to Web-Enabled Databases: Oracle (3) This course offers students an extensive introduction to data server technology. The class covers the concepts of both relational and object oriented databases and the powerful SQL programming language. Students are taught to create and maintain database objects and to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. They also learn to write SQL and iSQL *Plus script files using the iSQL *Plus tool to generate report-like output demonstrations and hands-on practice reinforce the fundamental concepts. This course in combination with INT 655 and INT 652 prepares students for the oracle certified associate certification. Requisites: PR, INT 250; PERM.

655 Web-Enabled Database Administration: Oracle (3) This class covers the fundamentals of database administration that will give the webmaster the necessary knowledge and skills to set up, maintain and troubleshoot an oracle database. Students will learn to create an operational database, manage both physical and logical database structures, manage users, privileges, and resources, use web-based support, administer basic oracle networking, and identify database tuning opportunities. This course in combination with INT 654 and INT 652 prepares students for the oracle certified associate certification. Requisites: PR, INT 250, INT 654 and PERM.

658 Law of Cyberspace (3) Is an in-depth examination of key legal issues central to the Internet. This course examines Internet operational issues such as copyright and fair use of images, text, video, audio, domain name registration, trademarks, trade secrets, patents, and ISP liability. It examines regulation of the Internet and key criminal and civil rights issues such as e-mail access, pornography, and hacking. It also examines important e-commerce concepts such as digital signatures, on-line contracts, and shrink-wrap contracts. Requisites: PR, INT 610, POLS 320 or GBUS 204, or permission from instructor.

660 Global Telecommunications Policy (3) Students will study the organization and operations of the federal communications commission and other telecommunications regulators around the world. Students will also investigate the United States Communications Act of 1934 as amended by various acts, such as the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Telecommunications regulatory models in various countries will be studied and compared. Privatization and liberalization trends will also be studied. Requisites: PR, Junior or Senior status, or PERM.

662 Modern Telephony (3) Students will study the public switched telephone network, the PSTN. Historical development of the network with introductions to telephone regulation, telephone network protocols and architecture, network design issues, traffic and queuing theory, multiplexing of voice, digital encoding of voice, xDSL systems on voice networks and expected future developments in the telephony field. Requisites: PR, MATH 110 or PERM.

664 Wireless and Cellular Systems (3) Students will study wireless radio communications from the basics of radio wave propagation to the complexities of cellular system design. Both stationary and mobile communications are investigated. Wireless data communications protocols for local area networking, point-to-point satellite communications, and first through third generation cellular air interface standards are also studied. Requisites: PR, MATH 110, INT 250, INT 291, INT 293 and INT 680 or PERM.

670 Workshop in Informatics + (1-3) Designed to give concentrated training in an area of Informatics.

678 Seminar in Information Networking + (3) Seminar courses are designed to provide in-depth study of specific subject matters in Informatics. Seminar courses will vary according to the needs of graduate students. Courses will include substantial interaction between students, and, students and faculty. Requisites: PR, As established by the instructor.

680 Network Architecture and Data Communication I (3) Students in this course will study the concepts and theories relevant to data communications for global internetworking. In the course, students will study topics that include the OSI model for internetworking, physical transmission media, electronic and electromagnetic signaling, analog and digital signaling, line coding, link layer protocols and local addressing, network layer protocols and global addressing, routing and queuing theory, LAN and WAN protocols, and Internet transmission protocols. This course is part of the 12-hour certificate in Internetworking offered by the Department of INT and it is a prerequisite to Network Architecture and Data Communication II. These two courses represent the theoretical side of the certificate program. This is a required course for department majors in the Computer Networking emphasis. The course is also part of the Justice Studies Information Networking Certificate. Requisites: PR, MATH 110 or PERM.

681 Network Architecture and Data Communication II (3) Students in this course will study internetworking services that reside in the upper layers of the OSI model, and advanced concepts not included in Network Architecture and Data Communications I. Topics may include but are not limited to: Internetwork Design, Internetwork Security, Synchronous Optical Network (SONET), Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Point to Point Protocol, advanced routing protocols, and other Internetworking services. Requisites: PR, INT 680 or PERM.

685 Fundamentals of Network Security (3) This is a course focusing on security concepts as they relate to internetworks, including: security policy design and management, security technologies and solutions, firewalls, hands-on implementation using firewalls, Authentication-Authorization-Accounting (AAA), and secure VPNs. Requisites: PR, INT 293, PERM.

695 Advanced Routing (3) Students will study the theory and application of advanced routing protocols for internetworking. This course explores the operation of Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). Network scalability issues and solutions, security and management issues related to advanced routing topics will also be studied. This is one of the four course series that prepares a student for the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) certification. Requisites: PR, INT 293 or PERM.

696 Advanced Remote Access (3) Students will advance their knowledge of the design, operation and management of remote access networks. This course includes the study and application of WAN protocols such as ISDN, X.25, Frame-Relay and PPP on remote access networks. It also explores dial-on-demand routing, dial-up network access, dial-backup solutions, traffic shaping, queuing methods and remote-access security. This is one course of the four course series that prepares a student for the CISCO Certified Network Professional (CCNP) certification. Requisites: PR, INT 293 or PERM.

697 Advanced LAN Switching (3) Students will expand their knowledge and will master skills in the design, operation and management of large scalable and reliable local area networks based on multilayer switching. This course includes the study and application of multilayer switching, hierarchical LAN switching design, fast ethernet and gigabit ethernet standards, study and configuration of LAN switch operating systems, and advanced VLAN operations. The course also explores ether channel, hot standby routing protocol, multicasting protocols, and security in the LAN. This is one course of the four course series that prepares a student for the CISCO Certified Network Professional (CCNP) certification. Requisites: PR, INT 293; Co-requisite: INT 695, or PERM.

698 Internetwork Troubleshooting (3) Students will develop knowledge and understanding of complex networking problems. This course is designed for students and professionals interested in solving complex networking issues in integrated LAN and WAN environments that include advanced routing protocols, remote access, internetworking and large or complex LAN configurations. This course includes the study of troubleshooting tools and methodology, routing and routed protocol troubleshooting, switch and VLAN troubleshooting, and WAN troubleshooting. This course is the culminating course in the four course advanced internetworking series. It is also the culminating course in preparation for the CISCO Certified Network Professional Certification. Requisites: PR, INT 695, INT 696, INT 697, or PERM.

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Graduate Credit Only

826 Graduate Internship in Information Networking (1-6) The internship is designed to supplement classroom instruction by providing the student with the opportunity to participate in a professional environment. It is considered the final stage of course work in Informatics and may serve as the culminating experience for INT/MLS graduate students. Requisites: PERM.

872 Readings in INT
This course provides an opportunity for special study by the student in the student's field of particular concentration or interest. Readings are arranged with and supervised by a supervising faculty member. Requisites: PERM.

876 Professional Topics in Information Networking + (1-3) This course is designed to provide applied and theoretical knowledge in information networking technology application, instruction, or administration. Courses subtitles reflect specific topics. Sample uses of this course would be: INT 876 Professional Topics in INT/Web and Video Use of Macromedia Flash or INT 876 Professional Topics in INT/Configuration of Optical Networks. Requisites: PR, Senior or graduate standing. Special requirements may be established.

+Course may be repeated
#Lab required
PERM: Permission
PR: Pre-requisite

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