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Department of Philosophy
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Rarick Hall 340
Phone: 785-628-4249
grice@fhsu.edu
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Certificate in General Philosophy

(Choose 3 courses, 9 hours)

Curious about philosophy? The Certificate in General introduces you to the foundations of the field, covering the major schools of thought that shaped the discipline of Philosophy.  

PHIL 100 – General Logic (3)
An introduction to induction, deduction, and common fallacies, the primary aim of the course being to develop skill in applying basic principles of sound reasoning.  This class is offered both on-campus and through the Virtual College. 
     
PHIL 120 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
An introduction to perennial philosophical questions concerning topics such as knowledge, doubt, God, freedom, necessity, good and evil, immortality, time, the cosmos, and the meaning of life, and to some of the most noteworthy attempts to answer them. This class is offered both on-campus and through the Virtual College.

PHIL 200 – Philosophy of Knowledge  (3) 
A study of philosophical questions about knowledge, such as whether it can be defined, whether it is one thing in the sciences and something entirely different in the humanities or in mathematics, and to what extent it is achievable by and desirable for human beings. 
 
PHIL 220 Classical Greek Philosophy (3)
A study of topics such as the fundamental nature of reality, the place of human beings in reality, the difference between knowledge and opinion, the nature of the good life, and the concept of freedom, through selections from the writings of the principle philosophers of the ancient Mediterranean world, especially Plato and Aristotle.

PHIL 320 Foundations of Modern Philosophy (3)
A study of topics such as the mind-body problem, the quest for certainty, the justification of governmental authority, and the place of values in a mechanistic world, through selections from the writings of the principal philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, including Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

PHIL 350 – Philosophy of Mind (3)
An overview of fundamental topics in the philosophy of mind such as whether or not mental processes are physical, the puzzle of mental causation, the nature of consciousness and intentionality, and the similarity of minds to computers. 

PHIL 458 – Philosophy of Art (3)
A study of philosophical questions about artistic creation and aesthetic experience, such as whether art can be defined, whether aesthetic value judgments can be justified rationally, how aesthetic values relate to ethical and religious values, and what the proper role of art is in a life well lived. 

PHIL 490 – Topics in Philosophy (1-3)
A study of a particular philosopher or philosophical topic not otherwise available in the curriculum. The content of this course will vary from semester to semester, and students may enroll more than once.  When topic is relevant and chair approves. 

PHIL 672 – Readings in Philosophy (1-3)
A tutorial course intended for those with some concentration in philosophy. The content of this course will vary from semester to semester, and students may enroll more than once. Requires permission of the instructor.  When topic is relevant and chair approves.

PHIL 675 – Seminar in Philosophy (1-3)
An intensive examination of a particular philosopher or philosophical topic. The content of this course will vary from semester to semester, and students may enroll more than once. Requires permission of the instructor.  When topic is relevant and chair approves.

 

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